What is a DMA and CBSA?

AAM unravels the alphabet soup of geographic acronyms.

 

Geographic data, whether based on state, county, ZIP code or other boundaries, provides a granular analysis of a publication’s penetration. Throughout AAM’s data and reports, we reference several acronyms that represent geographic areas. In this article we will focus on DMA® and CBSA and explain where you may find them in the Media Intelligence Center.

DMA® (Designated Market Area)

What is it?

A DMA® region is a group of U.S. counties that form an exclusive geographic area based on the television viewing habits of the people residing in the county. There are 210 DMA® regions covering the entire continental United States, Hawaii, and parts of Alaska. The DMA® boundaries and data are owned by The Nielsen Company.


What is included in it?

  • Based on a publication’s analyzed issue
  • Market code
  • ABCD county size (magazines only)
  • Market name
  • DMA® household estimates
  • Total U.S. print distribution by DMA®
  • DMA® Household Percentage (Compares the DMA® distribution to the DMA® household estimate)

Who participates in it?

  • AAM U.S newspaper clients
  • AAM magazine clients who opt to report ABCD county-level detail

Why would I use it?

DMA® regions are useful when advertising in local markets or aligning campaigns with television markets.


Where do I find it?

  • The Media Intelligence Center’s market search filter allows for a search of newspaper and magazine titles by DMA®
  • In the audience summary section of newspaper quarterly data and audit reports
  • By selecting the Designated Market Area (DMA®) report in the Newspaper Analyzer
  • By selecting the DMA® reports under the market analyses heading in the Periodical Analyzer

 

CBSA (Core-Based Statistical Area)

What is it?

A U.S. geographic area defined by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) based on census data and referred collectively to both metropolitan statistical areas and micropolitan areas. Metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas are defined in terms of whole counties or county equivalents.


What is included in it?

  • Based on a publication’s analyzed issue
  • Market code
  • ABCD county size (magazines only)
  • Market name
  • CBSA household estimates
  • Total U.S. print distribution by CBSA
  • CBSA household percentage (Compares the CBSA distribution to CBSA household estimate)

Who participates in it?

  • AAM U.S newspaper clients
  • AAM magazine clients who opt to report ABCD county-level detail

Why would I use it?

CBSA regions represent the circulation of newspapers and magazines in well-populated urban centers.


Where do I find it?

  • The Media Intelligence Center’s market search filter allows for a search of newspaper and magazine titles by CBSA.
  • By selecting the Core-Based Statistical Area (CBSA) report in the Newspaper Analyzer.
  • By selecting the MSA/CBSA reports under the market analyses heading in the Periodical Analyzer.

 

And here’s one last bonus acronym: ZIP code. ZIP stands for Zone Improvement Plan, but is popularly referred to by its acronym, which has become synonymous with postal codes. ZIP codes are one of the most popular geographic breakdowns for newspapers. Where is newspaper ZIP code data located? Check out this article for the top three places.

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